post-title Vintage Finishes 2019-04-20 17:27:43 yes no Posted by: Categories: Uncategorized

Vintage Finishes

In addition to wood stains and lacquer finish in the latest color trend for cabinetry, there are also hand finish applications using different techniques to achieve an antique or custom look. Whether you want to create a room that looks like you have inherited cherished antiques or wish to reminisce of a time gone by, these finishes are referred to as Vintage Finishes

There are three broad categories to these specialty finishes. Glazing, Distressing and Special Effects.

Glazing

With Glazing you apply a base coat of colour on to the door. After the base coat dries, glazes are applied to achieve desired effects. There are different techniques used to produce a glazed finish.

  • Patting glazing: this is also known as a sponging technique. Using a wet sponge apply glaze in subtle tapping strokes.
  • Burnished glazing: A colored glaze is applied all over the surface and left for a few minutes to allow to penetrate into pores and cervices of the surface. It is then wiped off allowing it to contribute to the base color of the wood or MDF surface.
  • Striated glazing: this technique looks like brush strokes in the glaze color have been left behind on the surface. Brushed strokes can be both vertical and horizontal however most popular is pulled down vertically.

DISTRESSING

Distressing can only be done on wood and is meant to age the furniture or door. To create a worn-out rugged look, distressing can be achieved by creating dents, chisel cuts, relief marks and wearing out surfaces by using sand paper.

SPECIAL EFFECTS

There are three popular special effects in Vintage finishes. Most popular are Crackle, Spatter and Wear -through. A special product is applied to the surface of the piece to recreate an aged surface.

  • Crackle recreates what would be normal finish deterioration such as when furniture is exposed to weather conditions of moisture and heat. Crackle looks like what you would see in porcelain over time.
  • Spatter is when lacquer is sprayed across the surface in random patterns. The effect can be large watery marks, or small dark pinpoints. This effect adds depth to the finish
  • Wear-through occurs when raised edges have been worn down naturally though continuous use over the years.



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